[gov3009-l] Gelman on "Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State"

Justin Grimmer jgrimmer at fas.harvard.edu
Wed Sep 10 11:13:11 EDT 2008


Dear Applied Statistics Community,

 Welcome back for the 2008-2009 academic year.  We have an exciting lineup
of speakers this coming semester.  The workshop kicks off this coming
Wednesday, September 17th, with Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and
Political Science, Columbia University.  Andrew will be presenting results
from his recently released book "Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor
State".  Here is an introduction to the book from the publisher:

 With wit and prodigious number crunching, Andrew Gelman and his coauthors
get to the bottom of why Democrats win elections in wealthy states while
Republicans get the votes of richer voters, how the two parties have become
ideologically polarized, and other issues. Gelman uses eye-opening,
easy-to-read graphics to unravel the mystifying patterns of recent voting,
and in doing so paints a vivid portrait of the regional differences that
drive American politics. He demonstrates in the plainest possible terms how
the real culture war is being waged among affluent Democrats and
Republicans, not between the haves and have-nots; how religion matters for
higher-income voters; how the rich-poor divide is greater in red not blue
states--and much more.

 With the excitement surrounding the current presidential races, this
presentation promises to be informative to anyone interested in separating
the facts from the myths about vote choice in America.  For those
interested, a blog is available about the book <http://redbluerichpoor.com/> ,
which is also available for
purchase<http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/069113927X?ie=UTF8&tag=restblstristp-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=069113927X>
.

 As a reminder, the applied statistics workshop meets every Wednesday in
CGIS-Knafel, 1737 Cambridge St, room K-354 (Previously N-354, before the
Chad Johnson/Prince-esque name change that recently swept through the north
building).  We start at 12 noon with a light lunch and the presentations
usually begin around 1215.

 To give Andrew the maximum amount of time, we will skip the normal
"business" meeting that usually starts the year.  If anyone has any
suggestions about how the workshop could improve, or would like to present
at the workshop this year, please let me know (email would probably be the
quickest and most effective method)

Cheers

Justin Grimmer
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