[gov3009-l] Applied Statistics - 2/3 - Nicole Immorlica

Aaron Kaufman aaronkaufman at fas.harvard.edu
Mon Feb 1 09:45:04 EST 2016


Hi everyone!

This week at the Applied Statistics Workshop we will be welcoming *Nicole
Immorlica*, Researcher in the Microsoft Research New England Theory Group,
where she studies algorithmic game theory. She will be presenting work
entitled *The Degree of Segregation in Social Networks**.*  Please find the
abstract below and on the website
<http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/presentations/232016-nicole-immorlica-microsoft-research-title-coming>
.

As usual, we will meet in CGIS Knafel Room 354 from noon to 1:30pm, and
lunch will be provided.  See you all there! To view previous Applied
Statistics presentations, please visit the website
<http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/videos>.

-- Aaron Kaufman

Title: The Degree of Segregation in Social Networks

In 1969, economist Thomas Schelling introduced a landmark model of racial
segregation in which individuals choose residences based on the racial
composition of the corresponding neighborhoods. Simple simulations of
Schelling's model suggest this local behavior can cause segregation even
for racially tolerant individuals. In this talk, we provide rigorous
analyses of the degree of segregation in Schelling's model on
one-dimensional and two-dimensional lattices. We see that if agents refuse
to live in neighborhood in which their type constitutes a strict minority,
then the outcome is nearly integrated: the average size of an
ethnically-homogeneous region is independent of the size of the society and
only polynomial in the size of the neighborhood. A natural question arises
regarding how tolerance impacts segregation. We show the surprising result
that tolerance can actually increase segregation: the average size of an
ethnically-homogeneous region is now exponential in the size of the
neighborhood.
-- 
Aaron R Kaufman
PhD Candidate, Harvard University
Department of Government
818.263.5583
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