<p>The Applied Statistics Workshop presents another installment this
week with Thomas Cook, Department of Sociology, Northwestern University
presenting a talk entitled, <a href="http://people.fas.harvard.edu/%7Ejgrimmer/Cook.doc">&quot;When
the causal estimates from randomized experiments and non-experiments
coincide: Empirical findings from the within-study comparison
literature.&quot;</a>  Here is an excerpt from the paper:</p>

<div id="a000787more"><div id="more">
<blockquote>The present paper has several purposes. It seeks to up-date
the literature since Glazerman et al. (2003) and Bloom et al. (2005)
and to move it beyond its near exclusive focus on job training. We have
examined the job training studies, and find nothing to challenge the
past conclusions described above. However, the more recent studies
allow us to broach three questions that are more finely differentiated
than whether experiments and non-experiments produce comparable
findings:
<p>1. Do experiments and RDD studies produce comparable effect sizes? We have found three examples attempting this comparison. </p>

<p>2. Do comparable effect sizes result when the non-experiment depends
on selecting one or more intact comparison groups that are deliberately
matched on pretest measures of the posttest outcome, as recommended in
Cook &amp; Campbell (1979)? Thus, in a non-experiment with schools as
the unit of assignment, intervention schools are carefully matched with
intact non-intervention schools in the hope that the average treatment
and comparison schools will not differ on pretest achievement, let us
say, though they may differ on unobservables. We have found three
studies with this focus.</p>

<p>3. Do experiments and non-experiments produce comparable effect
sizes when the intervention and comparison units do differ at pretest
and so statistical adjustments or individual matches are constructed to
control for this demonstrated non-equivalence? This question has
dominated the literature to date, and we found six studies outside of
job training that asked this question</p></blockquote>

<p>We will meet at 12 noon in CGIS-Knafel N354 and the talk will begin
at 1215pm. And of course a delicious, free lunch will be provided.</p><br><p><br></p>Please email me with any questions/concerns/suggestions for the workshop<br><br>Justin Grimmer<br>
</div></div>