Dear Applied Statistics Community,<br><br>The applied statistics workshop is back for another exciting installment.&nbsp; This week we have Damon Centola, RWJ Scholar, Harvard University to present on &#39;Diffusion in Social Networks: New Theory and Experiments&#39; .&nbsp; Damon provided the following abstract for his talk:
<br><br>The strength of weak ties is that they tend to be long  they connect<br>socially distant locations. Research on "small worlds" shows that these<br>long ties can dramatically reduce the "degrees of separation" of a
<br>social network, thereby allowing ideas and behaviors to rapidly diffuse.<br>However, I show that the opposite can also be true. Increasing the<br>frequency of long ties in a clustered social network can also inhibit<br>
the diffusion of collective behavior across a population. For health<br>related behaviors that require strong social reinforcement, such as<br>dieting, exercising, smoking, or even condom use, successful diffusion<br>may depend primarily on the width of bridges between otherwise distant
<br>locations, not just their length. I present formal and computational<br>results that demonstrate these findings, and then propose an<br>experimental design for empirically testing the effects of social<br>network topology on the diffusion of health behavior.
<br><br>The workshop is held on Wednesday at 12 noon in room N 354, CGIS Knafel (1737 Cambridge St).&nbsp; And a light lunch will be served.<br><br><br>If you have any questions or concerns please don&#39;t hesistate to contact me,
<br><br>Best,<br>Justin Grimmer<br><br>