<div id="1g4e" class="ArwC7c ckChnd">

<p>Dear Applied Statistics Community,</p>

<p>&nbsp;</p>

<p>Apologies for the late email this weekówe&#39;ve experienced
some last minute scheduling changes.<span>&nbsp;
</span>This week Kevin Quinn, Department of Government, will present <span>&nbsp;</span>&#39;Assessing Political Positions of Media&#39; a
project that is joint with Daniel Ho, Stanford Law School.<span>&nbsp; </span>Kevin provided the following abstract: </p>





<p><span>Although central to understanding the role of
the media, few quantitative measures of the<br>political positions of media exist. We amass
a new, large-scale dataset to shed light on this question. Collecting and
classifying over 1500 editorials adopted by 25 major U.S. newspapers on 495
Supreme Court cases from 1994-2004, we apply an item response theoretic
approach to place newspapers on a substantively meaningful and long validated scale
of political preferences. Our results provide significant insights into the
study of the media. We show that 18 of the 25 papers are more likely to the
left of the median Justice for this period, but also considerable evidence that
this may be an artifact of the liberalness of urban, elite, high circulation
papers.</span></p>

<p><span>&nbsp;</span></p>



<p><span> Kevin also provided a link to the paper,
which is available here:</span></p>



<p><span>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/%7Ekquinn/papers/Ho_Quinn_unblind.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~kquinn/papers/Ho_Quinn_unblind.pdf</a></span></p>



<p><span>Our workshop will convene this Wednesday at 12 noon with a
light lunch, with the presentation to start at 1215.<span>&nbsp; </span>We are located in CGIS-Knafel (1737 Cambridge St) Room
N-354.<span>&nbsp; </span></span></p>

<p><span>&nbsp;</span></p>

<p><span>Please Contact me with any questions, comments, or concerns</span></p><font color="#888888">

<span style="font-size: 12pt;">Justin Grimmer</span>
</font></div>