<div dir="ltr"><p class="MsoNormal">Dear Applied Statistics Workshop,</p>

<p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p>

<p class="MsoNormal">Please note, there has been a scheduling change.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </span>Kosuke Imai, Department of Politics,
Princeton University, will be presenting on November 12<sup>th</sup>.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"></p>

<p class="MsoNormal">In Kosuke's place, this wednesday, October 22<sup>nd</sup>, <span style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp;</span>Don Rubin, Professor of Statistics, Harvard
University, will present his paper, "For Objective Causal Inference, Design
Trumps Analysis".<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </span>Don provided the
following abstract,</p><p class="MsoNormal"></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:9.0pt;font-family:Times-Roman">For obtaining causal
inferences that are objective, and therefore have the best chance of revealing
scientific truths, carefully designed and executed randomized experiments are
generally considered to be the gold standard.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp;
</span>Observational studies, in contrast, are generally fraught with problems
that compromise any claim for objectivity of the resulting causal inferences.
The thesis here is that observational studies have to be carefully designed to
approximate randomized experiments, in particular, without examining any final outcome
data. Often a candidate data set will have to be rejected as inadequate because
of lack of data on key covariates, or because of lack of overlap</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:9.0pt;font-family:Times-Roman">in the distributions
of key covariates between treatment and control groups, often revealed by
careful propensity score analyses. Sometimes the template for the approximating
randomized experiment will have to be altered, and the use of principal
stratification can be helpful in doing this. These issues are discussed and
illustrated using the framework of potential outcomes to define causal effects,
which greatly clarifies critical issues.</span><span style="font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Times-Roman"></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><br></p><p class="MsoNormal"></p>

<p class="MsoNormal">Don has provided the full paper available here:</p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://people.fas.harvard.edu/~jgrimmer/Rubin2008.pdf">http://people.fas.harvard.edu/~jgrimmer/Rubin2008.pdf</a></p>

<p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p>

<p class="MsoBodyText"><span class="apple-style-span">The applied statistics
workshop meets at 12 noon in Room K-354, CGIS Knafel (1737 Cambridge St), with
a light lunch. Our presentations begin at 1215 and usually conclude around 130
pm. As always, everyone is welcome!</span></p><p class="MsoBodyText"><br></p><p class="MsoBodyText">Cheers</p><p class="MsoBodyText">Justin Grimmer</p></div>