<p class="MsoNormal">Dear Applied Statistics Community,</p>



<p class="MsoNormal">Please join us Wednesday, November 19<sup>th</sup>, when
Adam Glynn—Government Department—will present his research, "Assessing the
Empirical Evidence for Mechanism Specific Causal Effects".<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Adam provided the following abstract:</p>



<p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;<br>Social scientists often cite the importance of mechanism
specific causal<br>
knowledge, both for its intrinsic scientific value and as a necessity for<br>
informed policy. In this talk, I use counterfactual causal models to re-assess<br>
the empirical evidence for two oft cited examples from American and comparative<br>
politics: the voting habit effect that is not due to campaign attention and the<br>
effect of oil production on the likelihood of civil war onset that is due to<br>
the weakening of state capacity. Utilizing decompositions of direct and<br>
indirect effects, I discuss a number of identification strategies, and<br>
demonstrate through sensitivity and bounding analysis that the evidence for the<br>
aforementioned examples is weaker than is typically understood.</p>



<p class="MsoNormal">The applied statistics workshop meets at 12 noon in room
K-354, CGIS-Knafel (1737 Cambridge St) with a light lunch.&nbsp; Presentations
start at 1215 pm and usually end around 130 pm.&nbsp; As always, all are
welcome and please email me with any questions</p>



<p class="MsoNormal"> Cheers,<br><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;">Justin Grimmer</span></p>