Dear Applied Statistics Community,<div><br></div><div>Please join us this Wednesday, December 3rd when Michael Peress, Department of Political Science, University of Rochester, will be presenting, &quot;Estimating Proposal and Status Quo Locations Using Voting and Cosponsorship Data&quot;. &nbsp;Michael provided the following abstract,&nbsp;</div>

<div><br></div><div><div>Theories of lawmaking generate predictions for the policy outcome as a function of the</div><div>status quo. These theories are difficult to test because existing ideal point estimation techniques</div>

<div>do not recover the locations of proposals or status quos. Instead, such techniques only recover</div><div>cutpoints. This limitation has meant that existing tests of theories of lawmaking have been</div><div>indirect in nature. I propose a method of directly measuring ideal points, proposal locations, and</div>

<div>status quo locations on the same multidimensional scale, by employing a combination of voting</div><div>data, bill and amendment cosponsorship data, and the congressional record. My approach works</div><div>as follows. First, we can identify the locations of legislative proposals (bills and amendments) on</div>

<div>the same scale as voter ideal points by jointly scaling voting and cosponsorship data. Next, we</div><div>can identify the location of the final form of the bill using the location of last successful</div><div>amendment (which we already know). If the bill was not amended, then the final form is simply</div>

<div>the original bill location. Finally, we can identify the status quo point by employing the cutpoint</div><div>we get from scaling the final passage vote. To implement this procedure, I automatically coded</div><div>
data on the congressional record available from <a href="http://www.thomas.gov" target="_blank">www.thomas.gov</a>. I apply this approach to recent</div>
<div>sessions of the U.S. Senate, and use it to test the implications of competing theories of</div><div>lawmaking.</div><div><br></div><div>A copy of the paper is available here:</div><div><a href="http://people.fas.harvard.edu/~jgrimmer/StatusQuos.pdf" target="_blank">http://people.fas.harvard.edu/~jgrimmer/StatusQuos.pdf</a><br>

</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; ">The applied statistics workshop meets at 12 noon in room K-354, CGIS-Knafel (1737 Cambridge St) with a light lunch.&nbsp; Presentations start at 1215 pm and usually end around 130 pm.&nbsp; As always, all are welcome and please email me with any questions.<br>
</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;"><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;">Cheers</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;">Justin Grimmer</span></div>
</div>