<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; "><div>Dear Applied Statistics Community,</div><div><br></div><div>We are pleased to announce a special presentation that should be of interest.  David Firth, Professor of Statistics at the University of Warwick, will present on Quasi Variances this *Thursday* from 12-2 pm in room K-354 in CGIS-Knafel (1737 Cambridge St, the usual meeting place for the applied statistics workshop).  Professor Firth provided the following abstract for his presentation:</div>
<br>The notion of quasi variances, as a device for both simplifying and enhancing the presentation of additive categorical-predictor effects in statistical models, was developed in <span class="il" style="background-image: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; -webkit-background-clip: initial; -webkit-background-origin: initial; background-color: rgb(187, 218, 253); background-position: initial initial; ">Firth</span> and de Menezes (Biometrika, 2004, 65-80). The approach generalizes the earlier idea of &quot;floating absolute risk&quot; (Easton et al., Statistics in Medicine, 1991), which has become rather controversial in epidemiology. In this talk I will outline and exemplify the method, and discuss its extension to some other contexts such as parameters that may be arbitrarily scaled and/or rotated.  </span><div>
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;"><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; ">Everyone (especially graduate students) is welcome and encouraged to attend.  </span><br>
</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;">A bit of background on Professor Firth.  He is Professor of Statistics at the University of Warwick. He specializes in statistical theory and methods, and has a particular interest in generalized linear models---especially as applied to the social sciences. He has published extensively in the discipline&#39;s major journals of record, such as JRSS and Biometrika, and has written several packages for the R language and environment. He has made several significant contributions to the field, and is well known as the inventor of bias-reduced logistic regression (also known as &#39;Firthit&#39;).</span></div>
<div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; ">He is at IQSS as a Distinguished Visiting Fellow (April 7--17), and will be spending part of his time here working with Arthur Spirling on models of momentum for contest data.<br>
</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;"><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;">We hope everyone will be able to attend</span></div>
<div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;"><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;">Cheers</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;">Justin</span></div>
<div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;"><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse;"><br></span></div>