<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252">
</head>
<body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">
Hi Everyone!
<div><br>
</div>
<div>I am incredibly excited to announce this week's speaker: <b><i>Professor Ned Hall from the Harvard Department of Philosophy</i></b>. The working title of Professor Hall's talk is&#18;&#18; &quot;In Praise of Causal Mechanisms.&quot; As per usual, the talk will be held in
<b>CGIS K354 on Wednesday (3/5) at 12 noon</b> and lunch will be served.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>You might be asking yourself: &quot;Why has Tess invited a philosopher to <i>Applied</i>&nbsp;Stats?&quot; Well, as Kurt Lewin, (sometimes considered the father of modern social psychology) once said: &quot;There is nothing so practical as a good theory.&quot; When I need some
 practical theory about causality, I turn to Professor Hall's work -- especially&nbsp;<a href="http://link.springer.com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/article/10.1007/s11098-006-9057-9">Structural equations and causation</a>, and his recently released edited volume,&nbsp;<a href="http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/causation-and-counterfactuals">Causation
 and Counterfactuals</a>.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>&#18;Here's Professor Hall's abstract:</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><span style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;">Consider two theses about causation: (1) Causes are connected to their effects by way of mediating&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;">causal mechanisms</i><span style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;or&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;">processes</i><span style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;">.
 (2) Scientific inquiry aims (at least in part) at discerning and describing the&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;">causal structure</i><span style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;of our world. Some of the best
 contemporary work on causation claims—often implicitly, but sometimes quite explicitly—that, in giving an account of causation, we should sacrifice (1) for the sake of producing an account that makes the best sense of (2). I will first try to show why this
 claim is quite attractive, and then obstreperously argue against it: I will aim to show that the best way to make sense of (2) is, in fact, by means of an account of causal structure that fully vindicates (1).</span></div>
<div><span style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; font-size: 16px;"><br>
</span></div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>
<div>&#18;Looking forward to seeing you all on Wednesday,</div>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Tess</div>
<div>
<div>
<div apple-content-edited="true"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; border-spacing: 0px;">
<div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; border-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;  ">
<div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">
-----------------</div>
<div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">
Tess Wise<br>
PhD Candidate<br>
Harvard Department of Government<br>
<a href="http://tesswise.com">http://tesswise.com</a><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</div>
</span></div>
</span></div>
<br>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>