<div dir="ltr"><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px">Hi everyone!</span><br style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><br style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><font face="arial, sans-serif">Our speaker this Wednesday (9/24) at Applied Stats will be our own</font><i style="font-weight:bold"> Brandon Stewart, </i>who will be practicing his job talk<font face="arial, sans-serif">.  </font>Brandon will be giving a talk entitled <b><i>Latent Factor Regressions for the Social Sciences</i></b><font color="#000000" face="arial, sans, sans-serif"><span style="white-space:pre-wrap"><b><i>.  </i></b></span></font><font face="arial, sans-serif">The abstract for the talk is included below. As per usual, we will meet in CGIS K354 at 12 noon and lunch will be served.</font></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px">I look forward to seeing you all there! <span style="font-family:arial;font-size:small">Thank you!</span></div><br style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px">-- Dana Higgins</span><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13.333333015441895px"><b>Abstract: </b>I present a general framework for regression in the presence of complex dependence structures between units such as in time-series cross-sectional data, relational/network data, and spatial data. These types of data are challenging for standard multilevel models because they involve multiples types of structure (e.g. temporal effects and cross-sectional effects) which are interactive. I show that interactive latent factor models provide a powerful modeling alternative that can address a wide range of data types. Although, related models have previously been proposed in several different fields, inference is typically cumbersome and slow. I introduce a class of fast variational inference algorithms that allow for models to be fit quickly and accurately.</div></div>