<div dir="ltr">Hi everyone!<div><br></div><div>For our final meeting of the Fall semester, this week we welcome<b><i> David Deming</i></b>, a Professor of Economics and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.  He will be presenting work entitled <b><i>The Value of Postsecondary Credentials in the Labor Market: An Experimental Study</i></b>.  An abstract is included below and can be found on the website (<a href="http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/presentations/presenter-david-deming-value-postsecondary-credentials">here</a>).</div><div><br></div><div>We will meet in CGIS Knafel Room 354 from 12-1:30 pm.  As usual, lunch will be provided.  See you all there!</div><div><br></div><div>-- Dana Higgins</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><b>Title:</b> The Value of Postsecondary Credentials in the Labor Market: An Experimental Study<div><br></div><b>Abstract:</b> We study employers’ perceptions of postsecondary degrees using a field experiment. We randomly assign the sector and selectivity of institution to fictitious resumes and send them to real vacancy postings on a large online job board. According to our results, a bachelor’s degree in business from a for-profit “online” institution is 22 percent less likely to receive a callback than a similar degree from a non-selective public institution. Degrees from selective public institutions are relatively more likely to receive callbacks from employers posting higher-salaried jobs, suggesting that employers value college quality and the likelihood of a successful match when contacting applicants.</div>