<div dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">Hi everyone!</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:12.8px">This week at the <span>Applied</span> <span>Statistics</span> Workshop we will be welcoming <b>Nicole Immorlica</b>, Researcher in the Microsoft Research New England Theory Group, where she studies algorithmic game theory. She will be presenting work entitled </span><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:arial"><b><i>The Degree of Segregation in Social Networks</i></b></span><font face="arial, sans, sans-serif"><b><i>.</i></b></font><span style="font-size:12.8px">  Please find the abstract below and on the </span><a href="http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/presentations/232016-nicole-immorlica-microsoft-research-title-coming" style="font-size:12.8px" target="_blank">website</a><span style="font-size:12.8px"><a style="color:rgb(34,34,34)"></a>.</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">As usual, we will meet in CGIS Knafel Room 354 from noon to 1:30pm, and lunch will be provided.  See you all there! To view previous <span>Applied</span> <span>Statistics</span> presentations, please visit the <a href="http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/videos" target="_blank">website</a>.</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">-- Aaron Kaufman</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:12.8px">Title: </span><span style="font-family:arial;font-size:13px">The Degree of Segregation in Social Networks</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:arial">In 1969, economist Thomas Schelling introduced a landmark model of racial segregation in which individuals choose residences based on the racial composition of the corresponding neighborhoods. Simple simulations of Schelling&#39;s model suggest this local behavior can cause segregation even for racially tolerant individuals. In this talk, we provide rigorous analyses of the degree of segregation in Schelling&#39;s model on one-dimensional and two-dimensional lattices. We see that if agents refuse to live in neighborhood in which their type constitutes a strict minority, then the outcome is nearly integrated: the average size of an ethnically-homogeneous region is independent of the size of the society and only polynomial in the size of the neighborhood. A natural question arises regarding how tolerance impacts segregation. We show the surprising result that tolerance can actually increase segregation: the average size of an ethnically-homogeneous region is now exponential in the size of the neighborhood.</span><br></p>-- <br><div><div dir="ltr">Aaron R Kaufman<div>PhD Candidate, Harvard University</div><div>Department of Government</div><div><a href="tel:818.263.5583" value="+18182635583" target="_blank">818.263.5583</a></div></div></div>
</div>