<div dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">Hi everyone!</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:12.8px">This week at the <span class="">Applied</span> <span class="">Statistics</span> Workshop we will be welcoming <b>Jann Spiess</b>, PhD Candidate in Economics at Harvard University. He will be presenting work joint work with Alberto Abadie entitled </span><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:arial"><b><i>Robust Post-Matching Inference</i></b></span><font face="arial, sans, sans-serif"><b><i>.</i></b></font><span style="font-size:12.8px">  Please find the abstract below and on the </span><a href="http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/presentations/2172016-jann-spiess-harvard-title-coming-soon" target="_blank" style="font-size:12.8px">website</a><span style="font-size:12.8px"><a style="color:rgb(34,34,34)"></a>.</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">As usual, we will meet in CGIS Knafel Room 354 from noon to 1:30pm, and lunch will be provided.  See you all there! To view previous <span class="">Applied</span> <span class="">Statistics</span> presentations, please visit the <a href="http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/videos" target="_blank">website</a>.</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">-- Aaron Kaufman</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:12.8px">Title: </span><span style="font-family:arial;font-size:13px">Robust Post-Matching Inference</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:arial">Nearest-neighbor matching (Cochran, 1953; Rubin, 1973) is a popular nonparametric tool to create balance between treatment and control groups in non-experimental data. As a preprocessing step for regression analysis, it reduces the dependence on parametric modeling assumptions (Ho et al., 2007). In this paper, we show how to obtain valid standard error estimates for linear regression after nearest-neighbor matching without replacement. We show that standard error estimates that ignore the matching step are not generally valid if the regression model is misspecified, and can lead to severe over- or underestimation of the asymptotic variance of the post-matching estimator. As a remedy, we offer two easily implementable tools for inference that are robust to misspecification: First, we show that standard errors clustered at the match level are valid. Second, we show that a simple nonparametric block bootstrap procedure yields a valid approximation of the distribution of the post-matching estimator. A simulation study and an empirical example demonstrate the importance and usefulness of our results.</span></p>
</div>