<div dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">Hi everyone!</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:12.8px">This week at the </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">Applied</span><span style="font-size:12.8px"> </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">Statistics</span><span style="font-size:12.8px"> </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">Workshop we will be welcoming <b>Heidi Williams</b></span><span style="font-size:12.8px">, Assistant Professor of Economics at MIT. She will be presenting joint work with </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">Bhaven Sampat</span><span style="font-size:12.8px"> entitled </span><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:arial"><b><i>Do Patents Affect Follow-on Innovation? Evidence from the Human Genome</i></b></span><b style="font-size:12.8px"><i><font face="arial, sans, sans-serif">.</font></i></b><span style="font-size:12.8px">  Please find the abstract below and on the </span><a href="http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/presentations/4202016-heidi-williams-mit-title-coming-soon" style="font-size:12.8px" target="_blank">website</a><span style="font-size:12.8px"><a style="color:rgb(34,34,34)"></a>.</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">As usual, we will meet in CGIS Knafel Room 354 from noon to 1:30pm, and lunch will be provided.  See you all there! To view previous <span>Applied</span> <span>Statistics</span> presentations, please visit the <a href="http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/applied.stats.workshop-gov3009/videos" target="_blank">website</a>.</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px">-- Aaron Kaufman</p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><span style="font-size:12.8px">Title: </span><span style="font-family:arial;font-size:13px">Do Patents Affect Follow-on Innovation? Evidence from the Human Genome</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="font-size:12.8px"><font face="arial" style="font-size:12.8px">Abstract:</font><font face="arial, sans, sans-serif"> </font><span style="font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:13px">We investigate whether patents on human genes have affected follow-on scientific research and product development. Using administrative data on successful and unsuccessful patent applications submitted to the US Patent and Trademark Office, we link the exact gene sequences claimed in each application with data measuring follow-on scientific research and commercial investments.   Using this data,  we document novel evidence of selection into patenting: patented genes appear more valuable — prior to being patented — than non-patented genes. This evidence of selection motivates two quasi-experimental approaches, both of which suggest that on average gene patents have had no effect on follow-on innovation.</span></p>
</div>