<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<style type="text/css" style="display:none;"><!-- P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} --></style>
</head>
<body dir="ltr">
<div id="divtagdefaultwrapper" style="font-size:12pt;color:#000000;font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;">
<p></p>
<div><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Hi all,</span><br>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>This week at the Applied Statistisc workshop we will be welcoming <b>In Song Kim</b>, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at MIT. &nbsp;He will be presenting work entitled
<b>&quot;When Should We Use Linear Fixed Effects Regression Models for Causal Inference with Longitudinal Data?&quot;</b> &nbsp;Please find the abstract below and on the website. &nbsp;The most recent version of the paper can be found here: http://web.mit.edu/insong/www/pdf/FEmatch.pdf</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>We will meet in CGIS Knafel Room 354 at noon and lunch will be provided.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Best,</div>
<div>Pam</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><u>Title:</u></div>
<div><u></u>When Should We Use Linear Fixed Effects Regression Models for Causal Inference with Longitudinal Data?</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><u>Abstract:</u></div>
<div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"></span>Many social scientists use linear fixed effects regression models</div>
<div>&nbsp; for causal inference with longitudinal data to account for</div>
<div>&nbsp; unobserved time-invariant confounders. &nbsp;We show that these models</div>
<div>&nbsp; require two additional causal assumptions, which are not necessary</div>
<div>&nbsp; under an alternative selection-on-observables approach.</div>
<div>&nbsp; Specifically, the models assume that past treatments do not directly</div>
<div>&nbsp; influence current outcome, and past outcomes do not directly affect</div>
<div>&nbsp; current treatment. &nbsp;The assumed absence of causal relationships</div>
<div>&nbsp; between past outcomes and current treatment may also invalidate some</div>
<div>&nbsp; applications of before-and-after and difference-in-differences</div>
<div>&nbsp; designs. &nbsp;Furthermore, we propose a new matching framework to</div>
<div>&nbsp; further understand and improve one-way and two-way fixed effects</div>
<div>&nbsp; regression estimators by relaxing the linearity assumption. &nbsp;Our</div>
<div>&nbsp; analysis highlights a key trade-off --- the ability of fixed effects</div>
<div>&nbsp; regression models to adjust for unobserved time-invariant</div>
<div>&nbsp; confounders comes at the expense of dynamic causal relationships</div>
<div>&nbsp; between treatment and outcome.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<br>
<p></p>
</div>
</body>
</html>