<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<style type="text/css" style="display:none;"><!-- P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} --></style>
</head>
<body dir="ltr">
<div id="divtagdefaultwrapper" dir="ltr" style="font-size:12pt; color:#000000; font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif">
<p></p>
<div>Hi all,<br>
<br>
This week at the Applied Statistics workshop we will be welcoming <b>Paul von Hippel</b>, Associate Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Texas-Austin School of Public Affairs.&nbsp; He will be presenting work entitled<b> &quot;<span>Maximum likelihood multiple
 imputation: A more efficient approach to repairing and analyzing incomplete data.</span>&quot;</b> Please find the abstract below and on the website.&nbsp; The paper can be found here:
<a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0870" class="OWAAutoLink" id="LPlnk661569" previewremoved="true">
https://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0870</a><br>
<br>
We will meet in CGIS Knafel Room 354 at noon and lunch will be provided.<br>
<br>
Best,<br>
Pam</div>
<br>
<u>Title:</u> <span>Maximum likelihood multiple imputation: A more efficient approach to repairing and analyzing incomplete data</span><br>
<br>
<u>Abstract:</u> <span>Maximum likelihood multiple imputation (MLMI) is a form of multiple imputation (MI) that imputes values conditionally on a maximum likelihood estimate of the parameters. MLMI contrasts with the most popular form of MI, posterior draw
 multiple imputation (PDMI), which imputes values conditionally on an estimate drawn at random from the posterior distribution of the parameters. Despite being less popular, MLMI is less computationally intensive and yields more efficient point estimates than
 PDMI. A barrier to the use of MLMI has been the difficulty of estimating standard errors and confidence intervals. We present three straightforward solutions to the standard error problem.&nbsp;</span><br>
<br>
<p></p>
</div>
</body>
</html>