<div dir="ltr">Hi everyone!<div><br></div><div>Due to a scheduling issue, Stephen Raudenbush will be presenting next week.  With less than 24 hours notice, <b>Mayya Komisarchik and Aaron Kaufman </b>have graciously offered to present their work in progress, entitled <b>How to Measure Legislative Compactness If You Only Know It When You See It</b>.  Please find the abstract below.</div><div><br></div><div>As usual, we will meet at noon in CGIS Knafel, Room 354, and lunch will be provided.  See you there!<br clear="all"><div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><br><div>-- Dana Higgins</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><b>Title: </b><u>How to Measure Legislative Compactness If You Only Know It When You See It</u></div><div><b>Authors: </b>Aaron Kaufman, Gary King, and Mayya Komisarchik</div><div><br></div><div><b>Abstract: </b><span style="font-size:12.8px">The US Supreme Court, many state constitutions, and numerous judicial opinions</span></div><div style="font-size:12.8px">require that legislative districts be “compact,” a concept assumed so simple that no</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">definition is offered other than “you know it when you see it.” Academics, in contrast,</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">have concluded that the concept is so complex that it has multiple theoretical</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">dimensions requiring large numbers of conflicting empirical measures. We hypothesize</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">that both are correct — that the concept is complex and multidimensional, but</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">one particular unidimensional ordering represents a common understanding of compactness</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">in the law and across people. We develop a survey design to elicit this understanding,</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">without bias in favor of one’s own political views, and with high levels <span style="font-size:12.8px">of intracoder and intercoder reliability (even though the standard paired comparisons </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">approach fails). We then create a statistical model that predicts, with high accuracy </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">and solely from the geometric features of the district, compactness evaluations by </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">judges and other public officials from many jurisdictions (as well as by redistricting </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">consultants and expert witnesses, law professors, law students, graduate students, undergraduates, </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">ordinary citizens, and Mechanical Turk workers). As a companion to</span></div><div style="font-size:12.8px">this paper, we offer data on compactness from our validated measure for 18,215 US</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">state legislative and congressional districts, as well as software to compute this measure</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">from any district shape. We also discuss what may be the wider applicability of</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">our general methodological approach to measuring important concepts that you only</div><div style="font-size:12.8px">know when you see.</div></div></div></div>
</div></div>